Game Review: Bad End

Not even a month into the new year & I’ve already completed three games.  Not bad!  Granted… they were all new games that I got over Christmas sales, so they don’t actually tick off my backlog, but… Oh well!

I can’t quite pin down one thing that drew me to today’s game, Bad End.  It could’ve been that it has decent reviews for a little indie visual novel game, or that it was discounted even more than it’s $2 price.  But probably a large part was that I have a thing for horror stories that take advantage of modern technology.  This love of being haunted through progress started with the movie Stay Alive, a movie about a video game that kills people if they die in the game.  And Bad End’s premise is basically the same.

header

The titular Bad End is a game within the game.  Players take the role of regular high school student Kyuuhei, who begins investigating rumors about a new mobile game that kills people after his best friend mysteriously dies of a heart attack the same night he texted Kyuuhei about getting the game to work.  Believing this can’t be a coincidence, Kyuuhei discovers that no one seems to know where this game came from, despite its popularity, & threads from people who get the game to work always end mysteriously.  Kyuuhei takes it upon himself to finish the game without making any mistakes to hopefully end the curse so no one else dies, but between the mental fatigue and ghostly phone calls, the line between the game world & reality starts to blur.

As with most visual novels, all of your actions are limited to simply selecting between various choices when the game prompts you.  But as the title suggests, these choices are littered with Bad (or quite literally Dead) Ends.


20170103185103_1Narrative: The overall impression I left the game with was that it was a missed opportunity.  There’s nothing in the story that I can point to as bad, but I don’t feel it was as good as it could have been.  The concept of controlling a character in a visual novel that’s controlling another character in another visual novel is interesting.  And the mystery revolving around the Bad End game (in the game) is well-paced.  I enjoyed solving the mystery along with Kyuuhei, always trying to stay one step ahead of the game.  I felt excited when I caught on to where the story was going, as well as a sense of accomplishment for being right.

That being said, I did find the resolution disappointing.  It was very clichéd, & surprisingly cheesy for a Japanese horror story.  If you know anything about Asian horror, it’s usually that there’s no happy ending.  I did figure out what was behind the cursed game, & it made sense… but I felt Kyuuhei was way too forgiving about the whole ordeal.  The “misunderstanding” killed a lot of people, including Kyuuhei’s stated best friend, & yet he seemingly overlooks this detail because he gets some T&A out of it.  I swear his last scene in the game comes across as, “It sucks my best friend in the whole world died, but at least I got a girlfriend!”  I don’t know… I’m not a guy, so maybe that would be their response, but it just irked me.

But, for me at least, the biggest misstep is all the squandered opportunities the story provided Bad End.  It had the potential to do some interesting things.  They could’ve done some fourth wall breaking stuff by having the character in the mobile game be self-aware & work with Kyuuhei (something that would’ve made sense given the origin of the cursed game), or even some double-fourth wall breaking stuff by having Kyuuhei realize he was being played.  At the very least, I would’ve liked to have seen something other than you-mess-up-once-&-just-die.  The way the store page & trailer presented it, I expected the real world to gradually become more dangerous as threats from the game started chasing Kyuuhei with each mistake he made.  What I got, however, was make a wrong choice & a ghost hand comes out of your phone & strangles you.  The End.  Maybe it’s not fair to judge a game based on what I wanted, & there were some clever bad ends in the beginning (like choosing to believe your friend really did die of natural causes, not pursuing the mystery & living happy life, or going insane from the constant calls from the dead because you couldn’t take the pressure of making a choice in the game).  But it really did feel like the studio dropped the ball.

Overall, aside from a disappointing resolution & some clichés, I can’t say there was anything “bad” about Bad End’s story.  But it wasn’t memorable either.

Score: 3


20170103213327_1Mechanics: What can you say about the mechanics in a visual novel game?  You use the mouse to select an option when prompted.  That’s it.  It is nice, though, that you can save whenever you want, meaning you can save before you make a choice & start back from there if that was the wrong choice.

As for the choices themselves, for the most part if you pay attention to what’s going on in the game it’s not too difficult to make the right choice.  Except for the very first choice made while Kyuuhei’s actually playing the game.  Kyuuhei’s first choice inside the Bad End game gives you one of three directions to run & there’s absolutely no way to know which one won’t get you killed.  It’s obvious when you make the right choice why it’s the right choice, because it’s the direction that leads you back to the main street, but prior to that the game gives you no clues about what’s in any of the directions you’re given the option to run in.  And given that you can actually make one free mistake (meaning you get a second chance) it feels like the developers knew this & were just being mean-spirited.  Like they wanted you to die here.  That just feels like bad design.

Not much else to say.  Just don’t be stupid, & in most cases you won’t die.

Score: 3


untitled-1024x680Aesthetics: If you’re not familiar with the visual novel style, most of the graphics consist of a background with still images of the characters speaking superimposed on it, with dialogue boxes beneath.  And while Bad End has all that, in comparison to other visual novel games I’ve played recently, the images are very uninspired.  Again, not bad.  They just look like your average anime.  The backgrounds are pretty generic, which is doubly bad considering you’ll be seeing the same places over & over.

The music likewise feels very stock.  I know I’ve heard some of them before, but I’m not sure if they’re stock music that comes with whatever program the developers used to create the game or if it’s from a royalty-free site.  Worse yet, none of the music seemed to really fit with the accompanying scene.  The normal music is way too cheery for the game’s themes, & the music intended for scary scenes wasn’t scary.  And as there are no voices, or any other sounds, the music is all you have to focus on.

Overall, there was nothing particularly bad in the presentation, but nothing to make Bad End stand out, either.  Everything felt very stock, & gave me the impression of not putting in much effort to give their game a unique feel.

Score: 2


Replay Value: Low.  There’s really no point to play Bad End more than once after you’ve beaten it.  Even if you’re dying to get all the achievements for seeing all the bad ends, because you can save before each decision you can just pick up where you died.  The game’s always really short, only taking a few hours to finish.  Score: 2


Breakdown

untitled

Final Score: 2

Final Word: Bad End reminded me of those Goosebumps Choose Your Own Adventure books. While there’s nothing glaringly wrong with Bad End, there’s nothing memorable about it either.  The most interesting thing about it is an interesting premise, & it doesn’t even handle that well.  Overall, I can’t recommend Bad End to anyone really.  Even with the low price, I can recommend much better visual novels to put that money toward over this.

–  GamerDame

Title: BAD END
Consoles: PC, iOS, Android
Rating: M
Developer: Arai Koh Create Office
Publisher: YOX-Project
Release Date: November 25, 2015

Leave a comment

Filed under 2, Horror, Indie, Mobile, PC, Reviews, Visual Novel

New Footage Suggests Andromeda is a Classless Game

With the newly announced release date for Mass Effect: Andromeda (March 21 of this year), BioWare has been steadily giving gamers more information about the latest in the franchise.  Yesterday, during the first day of the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Vegas, BioWare promoted gameplay footage of Andromeda showing off the tech & combat skills.  What caught my interest, in particular, was footage showing that, while not doing away with the previous classes entirely, it doesn’t appear that our Ryder is bound by classes.

In the gameplay footage, it shows that gamers will be able to switch between seven different “profiles.”  Rather than players having to pick a specific class at the start & being relegated to that set of skills for the duration of their game, they can switch between all the classes & upgrade the abilities & skills for each class individually.  I actually heard this mentioned during a developer commentary of the last footage, where they stated Ryder would have access to both tech and biotic abilities.  I had assumed at the time that this meant no distinctive classes but rather you upgrade whatever skills you want, similar to something like Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning‘s system.

It would seem that each profile has a unique set of perks & abilities.  In the footage, we see both the Soldier & Engineer profiles.  The Soldier profile shows bonuses to weapon damage, accuracy, clip size, & damage protection.  It also shows a perk called Marksman’s Focus, where you gain a damage bonus for “every target killed in a short time.”  The Engineer profile grants bonuses to “tech construct” stats & combo damage.  It’s special perk is creating a drone that decreases the recharge time on your tech abilities & can damage enemies when it explodes.  We only get to see the skills for the Engineer, which shows both some old familiars like Overload & Incinerate, but new ones, like Flamethrower.  The footage also demonstrated that upgrading these abilities will work similar to Mass Effect 3, where the first three levels are standard upgrades, but from 4-6 you get a choice of two distinct upgrades per level, such as a damage upgrade versus a duration upgrade.  Upgrading these abilities also increases your rank in each class, likely improving their specific bonuses.

The footage shows the six classes from the previous games, as well as one new one, titled “Explorer.”  We don’t get to see this class, but I would guess it grants bonuses that help when Ryder is exploring new planets, such as improving resistance to potential environmental hazards or more resources.

Interestingly, there appears to be an in-game reason for this ability to change classes.  In the Engineer profile, it reads “This Profile reconfigures Ryder’s implant…”  This sounds to like the Pathfinders were implanted with experimental, cutting-edge tech that allows them to switch classes as needed.  From a narrative perspective, this would make sense, given that the Pathfinders are meant to act as “elite soldier, scientist, & guide.”  For people who are expected to lead the search for habitable worlds, this would be a useful ability to improve their chances of success in unpredictable situations.

There are still unanswered questions with this new information.  Specifically, it doesn’t show if players will be able to change profiles on the fly, or if it’ll be limited, such as in previous games when you could only switch squadmates at terminals or upon exiting your ship.

I’m not entirely sure how I feel about this change.  I guess it all depends on how smoothly it’s implemented.  It doesn’t necessarily sound like a bad thing.  You can probably ignore any classes or abilities you don’t like.  It also probably means that there are more unique abilities & skills.  In the first three Mass Effect games, there was some overlap in the skills.  Each class had some unique abilities, but they also shared some.  For example, I always played as an Infiltrator, which granted me bonuses to the sniper rifle, but also a Tactical Cloak in later games.  It also gave me abilities like AI Hacking & Sabotage, which were shared with the Engineer class.  However, if players can change whenever they want, this may mean there’s less, or perhaps even no, overlap.  Each class may have its own abilities.  It wouldn’t make a lot of sense to have you spend upgrades on the same skill twice, although there might be value in upgrading a skill differently for each class.

Be on the lookout for more updates as they catch my interest.

– GamerDame

Leave a comment

Filed under News