Category Archives: Mobile

Game Review: Syberia II

Unlike the previous adventure game series I just concluded, I actually remember exactly what happened when I played the first Syberia years ago.  In comparison to the Still Life series, Syberia’s story is pretty self-contained, which can certainly be to a game’s favor.  Even if I don’t remember every single character’s name, I remember what happened &, most importantly, where the game left off.

250px-Syberia2

Syberia II picks up almost immediately after the events of Syberia.  In the first game, we played as Kate Walker, an attorney from New York, who travels to Europe to finalize the takeover of a toy factory, only to learn that the owner has just died, & that a brother no one knew she had is now heir, meaning Kate must track him down to go through with the deal.  Thus begins Kate’s strange journey through automatons and half of Europe as she follows Hans’ trail.  At the end of the first game, Kate meets Hans, now an old man, & they begin the final leg of their journey to find Syberia, a mystical land far to the north where mammoths still live.  Thus their journey concludes by the end of the game.

As with Microids other games, Syberia 2 is a point-&-click adventure game with a few puzzles thrown in for good measure.  As one might expect, traveling through the frozen wastes of Russia is no easy task, & numerous obstacles arise that only Kate seems inclined to solve, either by collecting the right item to unlock progress or reading clues in the area to solve some mild puzzles.


20170909121948_1Narrative: Although the first Syberia already had a pretty tightly focused story, Syberia 2’s narrative is even more self-contained, which I appreciated.  The story, settings, & events that unfold are more cohesive & coherent.  I remember in the last game a strange interlude with a creepy guy who made us bring him a retired singer because he was obsessed with her, resulting in Kate blowing up the factory for them to escape, only to return to her train to find Hans.  Talk about a series of unfortunate events.  But Syberia 2’s plot is more focused, & the problems that arise during it make sense, & seem very natural.  For example, the game starts with Kate’s train having to stop for coal, & she ends up tricking some local thugs for gas to power the coal shoot generator.  Given that these thugs seemed a little too interested in her train, it doesn’t come as a surprise later when they steal it & Kate has to chase after them.  Similarly, it’s not a surprise when Hans gets sick (because he’s an old man in the arctic), so it makes sense that Kate has to seek medical aid from the local monastery.  This also means that the few characters we interact with have a real presence in the game.

The only odd thing is a little subplot involving Kate’s boss in New York sending a private detective to track her down, hoping to bring her home, because they clearly think she’s crazy.  It’s implied this happens because Kate’s mom is hounding her boss, which any proper mother probably would do.  My problem with this subplot, however, is that it goes nowhere.  We never see the detective.  He has no point in the story other than relaying what we already know to the family.  He even gives up the chase half-way through, thus having absolutely no impact on the story.  I feel like the developers were trying to build tension, like we’re supposed to be concerned Kate’s being pursued.  The cutscenes certainly look foreboding, with everyone standing shadowed & faceless.  But we know she’s not in any danger because they just want her to come home, being naturally concerned about the physical & mental well-being of a New Yorker running off with a crazy old man in search of a place that might not exist into the arctic.  So the entire thread feels pointless.  I feel like they either should’ve had the detective actually be an obstacle, or not tell us who he works for & just leave us paranoid about a guy following us around.

But, overall, Syberia 2 has a tight story that never loses sight of its goal & the story it wants to tell.  I know a third game came out earlier this year, but personally, I feel this entry did a good job of wrapping up the story.

Score: 4


20170907182755_1Mechanics: I’m running out of ways to describe point-&-click controls.  They work.  I appreciated the run mechanic, as there is quite a bit of backtracking.  I liked that items leave your inventory when they’re no longer useful.  And I appreciated that the icon would indicate when a selected item wouldn’t work for a particular puzzle.  It really saved a lot of time from randomly trying everything.  I would just see the interact icon crossed out & move on.  I also never felt there was a time when I didn’t know what I was doing.  Even if I didn’t have the items I needed to progress, I usually knew what my goal was.  And there were no great leaps in logic, meaning I generally knew what an item would be used for, & everything made sense.

That being said, I did have one, at times, significant problem.  While generally what you can interact with is obvious due to subtle visual cues, there were a few times when I had to pixel hunt because nothing stood out.  And most frustratingly, at one point I had to look up a video because I knew what I was looking for but couldn’t find it.  Turned out the item in question had a very small hitbox, & looked completely like the rest of the background.  That did annoy me, but that only happened maybe twice in the entire game.

Overall, besides a few irritating pixel hunts, I thought Syberia is the perfect example of point-&-click puzzle solving done right.

Score: 4


20170909122314_1Aesthetics: Syberia 2 originally came out in 2004, so the character models are a bit dated & jankey, but not distractingly so.  The cutscenes fare bit better, although I couldn’t help laughing at times at their stretchy faces.  There were a few uncanny valley moments, especially with more bombastic expressions.  The backgrounds have an appealingly soft watercolor look to them, making me think of the paintings on postcards.

The voiceacting was decent, although there were a few suspect accents, & the actually acting felt reasonably natural.  The music all had the same soft quality as the backgrounds, subtly adding to the slower pace of the story.

Score: 3


Replay Value: Low.  I can’t see a point in playing the game more than once, as there’s nothing new to be seen on a second playthrough.  And you can watch the cutscenes after you’ve unlocked them if you really want to experience the story again.

Score: 3


Breakdown

Untitled

Overall Score: 3

Final Word: With its focused story, reasonable logic & streamlined mechanics, I think all but the most jaded gamers will find some enjoyment in this slower-paced adventure game.  It’s not long, & will leave players satisfied in the end.

– GamerDame

[youtube+https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mA64GHJNyuc]

Title: Syberia 2
Console: PC, PS2, XBox, Android, iOS, PS3, 360, Switch
Rating: T
Developer: Microids
Publisher: Microids
Release Date: March 30, 2004

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under 3, Adventure, Mobile, PC, PS2, PS3, Reviews, Switch, xbox, XBox 360

Game Review: Her Story

It seems that most of the games I’ve really enjoyed so far this year have all had one common trait: they embrace the fact they are games to offer a unique story-telling experience.  Movies & books are fairly passive, or perhaps structured is a better word, in how they present their stories.  The “proper” way to experience their story is from start to finish exactly as the writer intended.  Ever caught a movie halfway through & then have no idea what’s going on for the rest of it?  But gaming can shake this formula up.  Because it requires the player’s active participation, developers can present a cohesive story in unique ways.  Her Story is one such experience.

Her_Story_store_art

In Her Story, you play as basically yourself.  Someone sitting at a computer, presumably in a police station, searching through broken bits of video revolving around several police interviews of a woman named Hannah in regards to a missing person, & later a murder.  The plot is that you’re trying to figure out the plot.

I’ve seen Her Story described as an “interactive movie,” which is fairly accurate to how the gameplay is structured.  You’re basically operating a computer to search for small video snippets from Hannah’s interviews.  Although there are several interviews, they’re all broken into snippets of maybe a minute or so length, & you search for new pieces by entering keywords that Hannah says in the videos.  For example, the first video I viewed gave me an idea to search for “Simon” & “murder”.


2893760-herstory-2Narrative: As this is a very heavily story-based mystery game, having a compelling mystery is essential, & I’m happy to report that I felt Her Story‘s story was very well executed.  The mystery, once you piece it all together, was unique & well-thought out.  But what struck me as most interesting was how the player’s unraveling of the mystery is entirely dependent on their actions.  The story’s structure remains the same, but how you uncover it will greatly affect its impact.  You might find a key clue before another player, thus affecting the conclusions you draw about what happened.  It’s hard to talk about without going into spoilers, but an example from my own playthrough was that, for the longest time, I suspected Hannah had a Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly Multiple Personality Disorder) & that this alternate personality had killed Simon.  I found myself writing notes, paying attention to dates & timestamps on the videos to understand the timeline of the interviews.  I’ve never done police work, but it really gave me the sense of being a detective.

There are numerous small details that go into adding to the atmosphere of the game.  I know, it’s hard to imagine how a game that’s nothing but staring at a computer screen staring at an in-game computer screen can have atmosphere, but Her Story manages with its minimal presentation.  Everything just felt a little… off, in a way that’s difficult to give words to.  Perhaps it’s the welling sense that something very bad happened.  Perhaps it’s how Hannah always comes across as unbalanced and off-kilter, even before she’s accused of anything.  Even though I was just watching videos, I couldn’t help questioning myself.  Who was I, & why was I sitting in what felt like a dark, dank room in some police archive?  Was I even supposed to be there?  Why did I care about Hannah’s story?

Overall, if you let yourself get immersed in the mystery, you’ll find it a compelling story.

Score: 5


unnamedMechanics: Mechanics are minimal but work for their intended purpose.  You type in keywords to search, watch videos & can even organize the videos into a sort of save bar to keep everything in order.  There’s not really a lot to say in this regard.  Every aspect, however simplistic, served to aid in the illusion of the world the game was creating.  You even get little popup chat messages from your “coworker”.

If I had a complaint about the mechanics, it’s that the save bar feature could’ve been better.  In the beginning, I was trying to organize each video based on their timestamps so that in the end I would have a cohesive timeline, but it quickly became too tedious.  When you save a new video, it naturally goes to the end of your feed, but you can’t just drop it between other clips.  Moving it will swap the two clips’ positions.  So if you want to move a clip, you have to swap it with each sequential video up the line.  I gave up after a while.  While this took nothing away from the story, it was an annoyance.

Overall, simplistic mechanics that add to the purpose of the experience, but skip the save bar.

Score: 3


Aesthetics: As with the mechanics, the presentation of Her Story is minimal but utilitarian.  From the design of the desktop to the quality of the video clips, it felt like I was using an ancient computer stuck in some dungeon of a police archive.  I have to give a lot of credit to Viva Seifert, the actress playing Hannah.  I thought she gave a very convincing performance.  There’s a natural unnaturalness about her in the videos.  Her behavior is slightly stilted, which I think anyone’s would be while being interrogated by the police.

The game also has a lot of small visual cues & attentions to detail that help immerse players in the game “world.”  For example, two clips might show Hannah in the same outfit, but she has her hair up in one but down in another, giving you a clue that the second video comes later in the interview.  Another small detail that caught me off guard but increased my investment in the game was when the lights would flicker on my “screen”, making “my” reflection faintly flash across the desktop.  Such a small thing, but when I realized I wasn’t playing as myself but someone actually in the game’s world, it added a second mystery to solve.

Overall, the presentation is simplistic but with great attention to detail to help with immersion.

Score: 4


Replay Value: Low.  Nothing changes in the story, so I feel no need to replay the game.  However, as there is some fun to be had rewatching a mystery to with knowing eyes to see if you missed any clues, some gamers might enjoy replaying the game.

Score: 3


Breakdown

Untitled

Final Score: 4

Final Word: While it certainly won’t appeal to everyone, Her Story is a solid experience & great example of story-telling through mechanics, with great attention to detail.  If you’re a sucker for a good mystery or want to try something new, it’s work checking out.

–  GamerDame

Title: Her Story
Consoles: PC, Mac, iOS, Android
Rating: N/A (personal rating T)
Developer: Sam Barlow
Publisher: Sam Barlow
Release Date: June 24, 2015

Leave a comment

Filed under 4, Indie, Mobile, PC, Reviews